CBD and the Liver

Health

 

For those of you that have been closely following my blog you will already know that recently my ALP (alkaline phosphatase) test results were slightly elevated. If you haven’t read that post, you can click here.  Hi, CEO Olivia here, today I’m barking about CBD & the liver.

Back in March  2020 the FDA & the media were giving CBD some pawsitively negative coverage alleging that CBD raised liver enzymes.  The study they based this misinformation on involved a synthetic CBD isolate called Epidiolex. It’s made by a pharmaceutical company called GW Pharmaceuticals, who want to monopolize all medical cannabis medications. The dosages used in this study were pawsitively, dog gone, ridiculously high even for humans yet they were administered to mice. Also, because Epidiolex is synthetic, there were no other cannabinoids present, therefore there was no entourage effect.

But lets look at naturally derived CBD oil. Studies by the American National Institute of Health reported way back in 2013 that CBD had therapeutic potential for many diseases.

Time for a quick refresher, if you have a spine, you have a endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptors. There are two subtypes called CBD1 & you guessed it, CBD2.

In the liver & kidneys, if CBD1 receptors becomes overstimulated they weaken the CBD2 receptors, throwing both out of balance. This can lead to serious health issues. CBD1 is what’s called profibrotic which means it encourages fibrous connective tissue in response to an injury. CBD2 is the opposite, it’s antifibrotic meaning it impedes fibrosis & acts as a blood thinner. You can see how it’s impawtant that they work together in harmony.

Taking CBD from Cannabis/hemp has been shown to fine tune the CBD1 & CBD2 receptors & bring them back into balance if needed. Research suggests that taking CBD regularly can maintain this balance.

There have been published studies that have shown that CBD is beneficial to the liver & helps keep it healthy. In one study, when administered to rats who were intentionally given liver disease, the CBD killed off cells which cause scar tissue within the liver. Please note that we here at KTFGD’s are against using animals for lab testing.

Research is ongoing but time after time, results show that not only that there is no evidence of CBD oil causing damage to the liver, quite the opposite seems to be true. CBD appears to help maintain a healthy functioning liver.

I have continued taking my full spectrum CBD oil. I am going to dig deeper into that soon. huMom has observed no adverse affects & I’m 170 days seizure free today. If you haven’t, please sniff out my blog series exploring CBD, I walk you through from the plant in the field to the finished product. It’s benefits & how to avoid being sold ‘snake oil’ are also dogsplained. Here are the links:

Part 1 – CBDs, Cannabinoids, Endocannabinoids & Canines

Part 2 – What is Cannabis?

Part 3 – How CBD Is Extracted?

Part 4 – CBD Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum & Isolates

Part 5 – CBD Oils & Tinctures, What’s In the Bottle?

Part 6 – Understanding a CBD Certificate of Analysis

Part 7 – CBD Oils, What Should Be On the Label?

Part 8 – CBD Micro Dosing Explained

Part 9 – CBD & the Liver

Have a pawsome week.

CEO Olivia

PS 🐾 Looking for wagnificent healthy & furbulously fun toys or pawsibly a supplement for the well being of your pawtacular good dog or cat? Shop Naturally

CBD Oils, What Should Be On the Label?

Health

Hello everyone, CEO Olivia here. Today I’m wrapping up my deep dig into CBD, cannabinoids & endocannabinoids. As I’ve already mentioned, the Cannabis industry is not yet regulated. This lack of government regulation means there is no standard for the labels of Cannabis products, including CBD oils & tinctures.

A CBD product label should tell you the total amount of CBD in the product. This is commonly displayed as the amount of CBD in milligrams. This is the amount of CBD in the entire bottle, but it’s not a measurement of the product’s strength or potency.

Most CBD oils & tinctures come in 0.5 ounce (15 ml), 1 ounce (30 ml), or 3.3 ounce (100 ml) sizes. To calculate a products potency, divide the total amount of CBD in the bottle by the size of the bottle in millilitres. For example, a 30 millilitre bottle with 750 milligrams of CBD has a potency of 25 milligrams per millilitre (mg/ml). So that means a 30 ml bottle with 1000 mg of CBD has the same potency as a 15 ml bottle with 500 mg of CBD. In both bottles, there are 33.3 milligrams of CBD per millilitre.

A label should tell you if the product is full spectrum, broad spectrum or an isolate.  If not that information should be online on the company’s product page, also look for a third party analysis report.

Some labels have a recommended serving size, but it’s not written in stone. When trying any new CBD product, it’s best to start with a small amount & increase slowly until you find what’s best for your good dog.

A CBD product label should also tell you what other ingredients are in the product, such as which carrier oil was used. The most common carrier oils used with CBD tinctures & oils are coconut MCT oil, hemp seed oil & olive oil.

The product label should also list other ingredients, including any other beneficial herbs, artificial colors, sweeteners or flavors. Be sure to check the ingredients before purchasing a product if you have any dietary preferences or allergies.

I hope I’ve shed some light on this budding new industry. To sum up, do your due diligence, always look for a third party analysis certificate & most importantly, reach out to the company if you still have questions. Reputable companies will be more than happy to educate you.

Below are links to this whole deep dig series.

CEO Olivia

Part 1 – CBDs, Cannabinoids, Endocannabinoids & Canines

Part 2 – What is Cannabis?

Part 3 – How CBD Is Extracted?

Part 4 – CBD Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum & Isolates

Part 5 – CBD Oils & Tinctures, What’s In the Bottle?

Part 6 – Understanding a CBD Certificate of Analysis

Part 7 – CBD Oils, What Should Be On the Label?

Part 8 – CBD Micro Dosing Explained

Part 9 – CBD & the Liver

Understanding a CBD Certificate of Analysis

News

Hello everyone, CEO Olivia here continuing my deep dig into CBD, cannabinoids & endocannabinoids. Today I’m barking about understanding the impawtance of third party analysis certificate (COA) that any trustworthy CBD company should have public access to. If you see a company not providing COA’s, you’d best keep on walking.

When you see a COA, you’re going to see a lot of information, for example:

    • Cannabinoids: These are the naturally occurring compounds found primarily in the flowers & leaves of the hemp plant. CBD & THC are measured as well as several other cannabinoids, such as CBG, CBN & CBC. COA will tell you exactly how much.
    • Microbial: This test ensures that the product doesn’t have microbiological contamination such as bacteria (E. Coli or Salmonella), yeast or molds.
    • Residual Solvents & Heavy Metals:  Many hemp-derived CBD products don’t pass tests for things like Lead, methyl mercury or arsenic because of the soil they were grown in. Cannabis should be grown on farms that have passed extensive soil & water testing.
    • Pesticides: Anything you spray on a cannabis plant will show up in tests. Hopefully, that means no pesticides will be found in the product COA. You want purity.

Not every lab use the same units of measurement. Some labs test for mg per mL, some test for parts per million, while yet other tests are based on percentages. Before you can understand the lab results, it is important to know which method of measurement the lab used, the amount of the product provided for the testing & the actual sample size.

Here is an example of what a Certificate of Analysis looks like.

Next week I’ll be finishing off this deep dig by sniffing out how to interpret the label on a CBD oil or tincture bottle & compare what the label claims are to the COA results. I know this has been a confusing journey at times but I hope when we’re done you’ll be able to confidently make the best choice when buying a CBD oil, tincture or extract for your good dog.

CEO Olivia

Part 1 – CBDs, Cannabinoids, Endocannabinoids & Canines

Part 2 – What is Cannabis?

Part 3 – How CBD Is Extracted?

Part 4 – CBD Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum & Isolates

Part 5 – CBD Oils & Tinctures, What’s In the Bottle?

Part 6 – Understanding a CBD Certificate of Analysis

Part 7 – CBD Oils, What Should Be On the Label?

Part 8 – CBD Micro Dosing Explained

Part 9 – CBD & the Liver