Turmeric, Liver treats & Canine Epilepsy

Health

Turmeric dog treats

Hello one & all, CEO Olivia here. If you follow me here, on Facebook, or on Instagram you know I live with Canine Epilepsy.

Over the past few months, the frequency of my Grand Mal seizures has dropped considerably. I almost made it to 100 days seizure free. By contrast, for a long time after our house fire I had a Grand Mal every 11 days like clockwork.

My huMom keeps a journal where she tries to record every detail that might have an impact on managing my epilepsy. While reviewing her notes, two things stood out. It may be just a coincidence but then again, maybe we are onto something.

First, for several  months now, I’ve been given Turmeric paste with my meals. HuMom prepares batches of this golden deliciousness at home. It’s very easy to make. Follow the link above for the recipe.

Second, I’ve been eating lots & lots of dried liver treats. Liver is excellent brain food because it is packed with beneficial vitamins & fatty acids.

  • An excellent source of high-quality protein & amino acids
  • Omega 3 fatty acids
  • Vitamin C
  • Minerals such as zinc, potassium, magnesium, phosphorous, manganese, iron & chromium, some of which are very important for cognitive function & overall brain health.
  • Fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, K. Liver is the most concentrated source of retinol (preformed vitamin A) found in nature.
  • All of the B vitamins, including choline, B12 and folate, which support methylation, a biochemical process that is very important for a healthy brain.

A final possibility is that our lives have settled down a lot in the past few months. My life has been pretty routine & reasonably free of stress, so this may be also be contributing to my decrease in seizures. My huMom has also read that for humans, smiling is actually good for the brain so she tries to get me to smile a lot by playing, belly rubs & simply engaging & smiling at me a lot.

Whatever is going on I thought it might be helpful to share this information with my fellow epi-warriors. If you google Turmeric & epilepsy you can find a lot of information on the benefits of ingesting turmeric regularly.

Do you have a special diet due to epilepsy? I’d like to know more.

It’s not too late to enter my Barkday card drive for the Wally Foundation. You’ll be donating to a good cause & might win a wooftastic prize package. It is too late for snail mail but you can enter via PayPal. The account is wally@thewallyfoundation.com Just a dollar & leave a note saying, “Olivia’s Barkday”.

Paw here for all the details.

CEO Olivia

 

Turmeric for Good Dogs

Health, News

Turmeric-for-dogs

The turmeric herb is a member of the ginger family & is used for cooking, herbal medicine & dyes. Native to the Middle East & Southeast Asia, it has been a staple in cooking for thousands of years. Today it is a key ingredient in most curry dishes as well as Thai, Indian, & Persian meals.

But guess what? It’s good for dogs too. It’s an antioxidant so it can help fight cancer. It is also an anti-inflammatory & turmeric boosts the liver’s ability to metabolize fat & remove waste from the body. It’s high in fiber & rich in vitamins & minerals. Turmeric also helps with stomach ailments, digestive disorders, & reduces gas & bloating.

The suggested dosage is approximately 15 to 20 mg per pound of body weight in dogs, 150-200 mg for cats. A simpler way of looking at it is an 1/8 to a 1/4 teaspoon per day, for every 10lbs of dog weight. Sprinkle it right on top of your pet’s food & mix or if you home cook, add it to the recipe. Turmeric is a binding agent, so ensure that your pet has lots of water to reduce the likelihood of constipation.

Turmeric powder is commonly available in supermarkets. The quality may vary so read the label, it may be grown using pesticides & herbicides. This can lower the potency, so if possible, try to get high quality, organic turmeric. Be sure to store it in a tightly sealed container, kept in a cool, dark and dry place.

Further reading

CEO Olivia

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